Knife Rights & Saf Urge California Supreme Court To Affirm Legality Of… — Bellevue, Wash., April 14, 2015 /prnewswire-usnewswire/ —

What Knives You Can Carry Where In The United States

Can You Solve the Math Problem That Has Torn Singapore Apart?

Maine: Illegal to carry daggers, stilettos or “knives designed for harming others.” Maryland: You can’t conceal a throwing star, dirk, switchblade, gravity knife or bowie. Massachusetts: The few survivors of the last winter encouraged not to carry switchblades, dirks, stilettos, ballistic knives or ones with knuckle guards as they forage for what meager sustenance remains. Michigan: Anything goes. Don’t conceal stilettos though. Minnesota: Anything goes except for switchblades, don’t you know. Mississippi: You can’t own anything scary looking if you’re a minor or a convicted felon.
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Legal brief: Common pocket knives are not illegal daggers | San Diego 6 | Local News

The case stems from a dispute over section 16470 of the California Penal Code, which defines a dirk or dagger as “a knife or other instrument….that is capable of ready use as a stabbing weapon that may inflict great bodily injury or death.” But, for everyday pocketknives like the one at issue in Castillolopez, the definition applies only “if the blade of the knife is exposed and locked into position.” Castillolopez was convicted in 2012 by a San Diego County jury for illegally carrying a concealed dirk or dagger after law enforcement found a Swiss Army Knife with the blade open in his pocket following a traffic stop. The Fourth Appellate District of the California Court of Appeal later overturned his conviction, holding that Castillolopez’ pocketknife didn’t meet the statutory definition of an illegally-carried ‘dirk’ or ‘dagger’ because it didn’t have a locking mechanism. “For simply having a common, everyday Swiss Army multi-tool with the blade open in his pocket, Mr. Castillolopez was charged, prosecuted, and convicted of a very serious crime,” explained Lee. “We strongly believe that the Court of Appeal correctly held that the State’s arguments are wrong on the law and hope the Supreme Court similarly disposes of the matter in its forthcoming decision.” Doug Ritter, founder and Chairman of the Knife Rights Foundation, said that, “Ultimately, our important brief is about protecting knife owners from prosecutorial overreach by maintaining the historical definition of a ‘dirk’ or ‘dagger’ in California. If the State wins this case with their expansive theory on how a ‘dirk’ or ‘dagger’ is defined, every Boy Scout and slipjoint folding knife owner in California might one day be guilty of a felony.
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PR Newswire

Rancho Cordova Police say officers were called to the scene due to a drunken man allegedly trying to fight people inside the home. Once inside, officers were confronted by the man who was said to be armed a folding knife in each hand. The man threw one of the knives at an officer and hit the officer in the leg. A stun gun was then shot at the suspect, but he wouldnt go down. Still armed with the other knife, the officers say the suspect charged at them, forcing one of the officers shoot the man.
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Man Armed With Knife Shot By Officer In Rancho Cordova « CBS Sacramento

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Attorney George M. Lee filed the “friend of the court” brief filed Monday in the criminal matter involving Emmanuel Castillolopez on behalf of the Knife Rights Foundation and Second Amendment Foundation. The case stems from a dispute over a section of the California Penal Code which defines a dirk or dagger as “a knife or other instrument … that is capable of ready use as a stabbing weapon that may inflict great bodily injury or death.” But, for everyday pocket knives like the one at issue in the Castillolopez case, the definition applies only “if the blade of the knife is exposed and locked into position.” Castillolopez was convicted in 2012 by a San Diego County jury for illegally carrying a concealed dirk or dagger after law enforcement found a Swiss Army knife with the blade open in his pocket following a traffic stop. The Fourth District Court of Appeal later overturned the conviction, holding that the defendant’s pocket knife didn’t meet the statutory definitionof an illegally carried dirk or dagger because it didn’t have a locking mechanism. “Ultimately, our important brief is about protecting knife owners from prosecutorial overreach by maintaining the historical definition of a dirk or dagger in California,” said Doug Ritter, founder and chairman of the Knife Rights Foundation.
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