Japanese Folding Knives

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Japanese Knives

Japanese Traditional Pocket Knives; Folding Kiridashi Knife; Price List; Japanese Picnic Knife This knife with its wooden scabbard is perfect for the picnic basket.

Original Source: http://nihonzashi.com/knives.aspx

Amazon.com: japanese folding knife

Zenport K106 Grafting and Budding Folding Knife, Dual Edge Tip, 3-Inch Stainless Japanese Steel Blade

Original Source: http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&keywords=japanese%20folding%20knife&page=1&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Ajapanese%20folding%20knife

Japanese Knives

Japanese Traditional Pocket Knives; Folding Kiridashi Knife; Price List; Japanese Picnic Knife This knife with its wooden scabbard is perfect for the picnic basket.

Original Source: http://nihonzashi.com/knives.aspx

Amazon.com: japanese folding knife

Zenport K106 Grafting and Budding Folding Knife, Dual Edge Tip, 3-Inch Stainless Japanese Steel Blade

Original Source: http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&keywords=japanese%20folding%20knife&page=1&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Ajapanese%20folding%20knife

Japanese Knives

Japanese Traditional Pocket Knives; Folding Kiridashi Knife; Price List; Japanese Picnic Knife This knife with its wooden scabbard is perfect for the picnic basket.

Original Source: http://nihonzashi.com/knives.aspx


Rhino Folding Knife (Information Wanted)

This Rhino folding knife was given to me by some friends when I was 18. I cannot find out anything about the knife. I would really appreciate anything anyone…


xFrozen asked Does anyone know any recipes for Japanese food?

I need some recipes for a school multi-cultural festival. I am studying Japan and I need to know some recipes for food. I am very interested sushi, but I don’t care if I get any other recipes. Just tell me any good recipes.

And got the following answer:

I really love these recipes…enjoy!

Easy Japanese Salad

2 cucumbers
2 – 3 green onions
6 T vinegar
1 1/2 T sugar
6 T soy sauce
4 T vegetable or peanut oil
salt and pepper to taste
1 slice fresh ginger, shredded (optional)

Peel cucumbers and cut in half lengthwisse; with a spoon remove the seeds. With the slicing disk of a food processor or a knife, slice cucumbers into half-moon shapes. Place in a bowl, add sliced green onoins, and cover with a dressing made by combining all remaining ingredients. Cover and refrigerate for about an hour before serving. Serve on lettuce garnished with parsley or the green part of green onions.

Cylindrical Roll

Ingredients
12 cups of Sushi Rice
3 cups Crab Mix
3 cups Spicy Tuna Mix
1 pound Sashimi-grade Tuna
4 Japanese Cucumbers
2 Haas avocados
15 whole sheets nori (dried seaweed)
3 tablespoons white sesame seeds, toasted
1/2 cup wasabi
1 cup Shoyu (Japanese Soy Sauce)
1/2 cup Gari (pickled Ginger)

Directions
Place the nori shiny-side down in the palm of your hand, with the shorter side perpendicular to your fingers.

With your other hand, pick up a golf ball-size portion of rice and spread it evenly on the third of the nori closest to your thumb.

With your finger or the back of a spoon, rub 1/2 teaspoon of wasabi on the rice. Sprinkle on a light, even layer of sesame seeds.

Then stack the desired filling on top (Tuna, Crab mix, cucumbers, etc). Use your free hand, roll the nori into a cylindrical shape.

Fried Gyoza

5 oz Cabbage, chopped
6 oz Ground pork or beef (or
-combination of both)
2 tb Japanese soy sauce
1 tb Sesame oil
1 ts Mirin (Japanese rice wine)
-or sherry
1 Green onion, minced
1 ts Grated ginger
1 Dried black mushroom, soaked
-in 2 tb water
2 tb To 3 tb peanut oil
1/4 c Hot water
1 sm Pkg Gyoza skins (available
-at Oriental food stores)

—–DUNKING SAUCE—-
1/4 c Japanese soy sauce
1 ts Rice wine vinegar
1 ds Rayu or sesame oil

“Pot Stickers”

Cook cabbage in a small amount of boiling salted water until tender.
Squeeze out all liquid and mince fine. Chop mushroom. Mix soy sauce,
sesame oil, Mirin, pork, green onion, ginger, mushroom, and cabbage.
Refrigerate for 1 hour or more.

Place a scant teaspoon of mixture on each gyoza skin. Moisten edges
with cornstarch and water, fold over and seal. Crimp edges with a
fork. Cover bottom of a large non-stick skillet (electric is good)
with oil. Brown the gyoza over medium heat (350 degrees) turning
frequently. Add 1/4 c water to skillet- let, cover and steam on low
heat 7 minutes. Stir often to prevent sticking. Remove cover, raise
heat and cook for 2 minutes until crisp.

Place sauce on table in small individual bowls. Gyoza may be prepared
in advance or frozen. Lay them in a single layer on a greased cookie
sheet, and cover with greased paper. Thaw before cooking.

Curry Rice

INGREDIENTS:
4 cups steamedJapanese rice
2 onion
2 potatoes
2 carrot
1/4 lb Japanese curry roux
3 1/2 cups water
1/2 lb pork
PREPARATION:
Cut potatoes, carrots, and pork into bite-sized pieces. Slice onions. Heat a deep pan and saute the onion until brown. Add pork, potatoes, and carrots in the pan and saute together. Add water in the pan and bring to a boil Turn the heat down to low and cook for 40-50 min. Add potatostarch and water mixture in the soup to thicken. Add curry roux and simmer for 10 min. Serve the curry over steamed rice.

Alek D asked what is the difference between a forged knife and stamped knives?

i know you can get a forged knife and a stamped. is there any other way to have a knife made? and whats the best way?

And got the following answer:

A Forged knife is made by folding steel over and over in a heat process, a stamped one is simply stamped out of a sheet of metal and given a sharp side. Having one made would cost the earth. The Japanese are frantic about their knives, they are big on forged, try and find a kitchenware store that stocks a good range and go buy one and try it, make sure the handle is good and the knife feels right in your hand, good luck, happy chopping.

jaymax173 asked How did people get fires hot enough to melt there metal and heat treat it back in the day?

The asians even had to get carbon hot enough to fold into swards.

And got the following answer:

The japanese used large clay furnaces with bellows, filled with a mixture of iron ore and charcoal, which was burned to make the heat and also supplied the carbon for the steel mixture. This wasn’t hot enough to actually melt the metal, but it did mix the iron and carbon to make steel, which was then pulled out, sorted according to carbon content, and used for knives and swords.

Nova did an documentary about that a few years ago. Pretty interesting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWK-Gzyl6y8