Japanese Folded Steel Knives

Chef Knife - Folded Steel chef knife blade Sakura

Buck Knives History of Hoyt H Buck by James Huff

One of the most trusted names in pocket knives and hunting knives is Buck knives. Buck knives is the name of Quality in the world of knives. Buck knives where created by Hoyt H Buck. Hoyt Buck started making hunting knives as a apprentice in Kansas over 100 years ago. He later moved to Idaho and then started to make knives. After the bombing of Pear Harbor. When the military asked for help to arm the troops Hoyt Buck started to make knives for them to help in the fight, and got knives into the hands of as many troops as he could.

Later he and his son moved Buck knives to San Diego and started making knives on a much larger scale. This is where the Buck knives that we all know was made. It is called the Buck folding hunter and is one of the most copied knives in the world. Witch supports the claim that Buck knives is one of the greatest manufactures in the world and is why Buck knives are second to none.

Buck knives also made a survival knife called the Buckmaster. These knives where made for the military and also one of the knives that you know from the Rambo movies. Later Buck knives where also made for the navy seals. This knife is called the Knighthawk. This is another testament to the quality of Buck knives, one of the best makers of pocket knives, hunting knives, or survival knives world wide. If Buck knives are trusted by the U.S. military then I think that we all can trust them.

Later in 2005 Buck knives moved back to where it all started, back to Idaho where the first knives where made so help the war effort Buck knives has a history of being the best. From the first knives that Hoyt H Buck made to the Buck knives of today when we go hunting or fishing or on our camping trips, and all the knives that have served our young men and young ladies in the military. So if you want the best, buy Buck knives and you cant go wrong. They are just great knives.

Original Source: http://www.articlecity.com/articles/recreation_and_sports/article_3267.shtml


History of Knives By Rajkumar Jonnala on February 27, 2010 0

Knives as Tools

Knives have always been an extremely useful tool to have. They are probably one of the only tools that we use daily that were used by our distant ancestors. The Bronze Age brought about the first significant change to knives, though since its softer structure didn’t make the strongest of knives, many still preferred the “older” stone tool. Stone blades and knives really remained the preferred material up until bronze was replaced with iron which was considerably stronger than bronze.

First Improvements

Ancient Greek and Roman civilizations are credited with the first folding knives as well as knives with ivory blades. It’s believed that this was a result of the popularity of cut fruits – ivory blades prevented the transfer of the taste of rust (or metal).

Manufacturing Knives

Between 1095 and 1272 there were a number of Crusades launched by the Europeans. During this time they traveled to all corners of the earth fighting for ground and more. Like so many other conflicts, this created an opportunity. France began its manufacturing of cutlery offering blades of various sizes and shapes and in a variety of materials. France had a corner on the cutlery market (including knives) until about 1789 and even today, you’ll find several cutlery manufacturers still in France.

The “Pocket” Knife

Today’s pocket knife is believed to be started sometime during the 15th Century – again out of necessity. Remember, knives were the main tool at that time, there was no cutlery, as we know it today – people ate their meals with the blades of their knife. This is when it is believed that multiple-blade knives made their first appearance and most likely resulting in more folding knives.

Material Improvements

While most early knives were created from carbon steel (or iron), today’s blades are made of surgical steel, carbon steel or from martensitic stainless steel. What has not changed much is the overall design of knives.

Nearly all collectible knives and Scout knives are created from carbon steel. The reason behind this is believed to be that while this knife can oxidize easily, it’s less expensive to manufacture, it’s very easy to sharpen and once sharpened it has a great edge.

Useful Knives

It seems like today you can find a knife for any purpose including fighting, multi-purpose knives, hunting knives and more. This development really came about during the 19th Century, material was readily available and more people were adept at creating knives. Whether you are looking for a simple purpose knife or a collectible folding knife, today you will have no trouble locating them. Whether your tastes run to plain handles or intricately designed handles, there is a knife available to suit your basic needs, or your desire to collect a piece that displays exquisite workmanship.

Today

Today pocket knives are available for a fraction of the cost of what they used to be. You’ll find people from early teens to older adults, men and women sporting a pocket knife. Because of the impeccable record keeping that began around 1900, collectors have an easier time valuing and dating previously created knives, and particularly those rare hand-crafted ones. Knives are often used for wedding gifts, promotional items and more.

Original Source: http://www.sooperarticles.com/business-articles/marketing-articles/history-knives-45233.html

Japanese Folded Steel Knives News:

Japanese Folding Knives – Compare Prices, Reviews and Buy at Nextag

Japanese Folding Knives – 24 results like Cold Steel Paradox, Ontario Jpt-3s Drop Point – Blk Square Handle – Bp 8906, Cold Steel Cold Espada Extra Large Polished G10 …

Original Source: http://www.nextag.com/japanese-folding-knives/stores-html

Japanese Folding Knife: Laminated Steel Bladed Japanese Knives …

ShopWiki has 335 results for Japanese Folding Knife: Laminated Steel Bladed Japanese Knives, Pocketknife, including Zenport K106 Grafting and Budding Folding Knife …

Original Source: http://www.shopwiki.com/l/Japanese-Folding-Knife%3A-Laminated-Steel-Bladed-Japanese-Knives%2C-Pocketknife

Amazon.com: japanese folding knife

Zenport K106 Grafting and Budding Folding Knife, Dual Edge Tip, 2.25-Inch Stainless Japanese Steel Blade

Original Source: http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&keywords=japanese%20folding%20knife&page=1&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Ajapanese%20folding%20knife

japanese folding knives | eBay – Electronics, Cars, Fashion …

newly listed cold steel 21s spartan japanese aus8a grivory tri-ad lockback pocket knife new

Original Source: http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=japanese+folding+knives

Amazon.com: japanese folding knife

Zenport K106 Grafting and Budding Folding Knife, Dual Edge Tip, 2.25-Inch Stainless Japanese Steel Blade

Original Source: http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&keywords=japanese%20folding%20knife&page=1&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Ajapanese%20folding%20knife


KATANA (samurai sword)

The authentic Japanese sword is made from a specialized Japanese steel called “Tamahagane” which consist of combinations of hard, high carbon steel and tough…


Cameron asked what are the differences between hot- and cold-forged products?

i’m doing this just for curiosity. i’m thinking in terms of items like knives, swords, etc.
what differences would there be in the physical properties of a hot-forged blade vs a cold-forged one?
i know absolutely nothing about this, so please go about this as if you were explaining it to a five-year-old.

And got the following answer:

When a steel is placed under less stress that I describe below, the bonds of the iron atoms forming the iron crystals stretch (elastic deformation) and the steel remains soft and springy. A blade that is formed while hot keeps this springy characteristic. Down side: The blade is easy to dull and will not take as sharp an edge.

When a steel is placed under enough stress, the iron crystals or atoms slide over each other (plastic deformation) the steel becomes hard but brittle. Thus, a blade that is formed cold will be hard to dull and will take a very sharp edge. Down side: The blades brittle and easy to break.

The Japanese in the ritual of making a Katana found a way to make a blade that has a sharp hard edge and a soft springy center. Thus, they have the best of both. They do this by hot forming a blade that is pounded out several times and folded making a blade that at the microscopic level is laminated like plywood. This produces a very strong, springy blade that is difficult to break. Then the last step: The blade is heated and coated in a very precise manner with clay. The clay coated blade is then quenched in water. The clay allows the blade to cool in a differential manner. The outside cools very fast and forms a thin hard outer layer. The inside cools slowly. Thus, they get a blade will take a very sharp edge, does not dull early and yet is still springy and will not break

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuri_sword

Alek D asked what is the difference between a forged knife and stamped knives?

i know you can get a forged knife and a stamped. is there any other way to have a knife made? and whats the best way?

And got the following answer:

A Forged knife is made by folding steel over and over in a heat process, a stamped one is simply stamped out of a sheet of metal and given a sharp side. Having one made would cost the earth. The Japanese are frantic about their knives, they are big on forged, try and find a kitchenware store that stocks a good range and go buy one and try it, make sure the handle is good and the knife feels right in your hand, good luck, happy chopping.

Joop asked Where can i buy a set of ceramic kitchen knives ?

I see chefs using these on tv, and they seem so much sharper than steel, almost effortless to cut through big cuts of meat.

Is this generally true?

I guess they dont go blunt either? Does anyone know where I can buy a set. Also I know they are not cheap, do you think they are worth the extra price ?

And got the following answer:

No, it’s more of a misleading marketing than the truth. If they never went blunt, makers wouldn’t offer sharpening services now, would they?

I’ve used several ceramic knives and I can tell you ceramics is not ready for now to be a knife blade material.

1) Ceramic knives can’t get as sharp as quality steel. I have extensive collection of various sharpening equipment, including Japanese whetstones, ceramic and diamond sharpeners. I hand sharpen all of my knives, including ceramics. Like I said, ceramic never gets as sharp as the good steel, and second, the effort spent on sharpening ceramics isn’t worth the little extra edge holding you get from it.

2) Factory edge on ceramic knives is not as sharp as ceramic can be. So far every single ceramic knife I’ve had I managed to sharpen better than the stock edge.

3) Too brittle. Aside from the breakage issues which I haven’t ever experienced, but it’s easily possible, the real issue is the edge microchipping, which dulls the edge severely and really fast.
All that talk about ceramic never needs sharpening is not how things work out in real life. Yes, ceramics is much harder than the steel, even the best steel, but because it doesn’t have enough strength the edge which is a lot thinner, or at least supposed to be thinner than the whole blade chips easily.
I was using ceramic knives exclusively for soft vegetables, always on custom end-grain wood board and still, the blade suffered from chipping. I could see that very well a simple loupe.
Even when you wash those veggies thoroughly, there’s always a good chance small particles of dirt or sand are still on them, especially if you work with potatoes, leeks and such. And that’s how it chips.
On plastic boards things get much worse.

Sorry to disappoint, but they do go blunt, and the irony is, it can happen faster than with the steel knives. Speck of dirt that will chip the ceramic edge will probably bend the steel or chip it, but steel is very easy to fix, ceramics isn’t. Most of the people simply can’t sharpen them at home, and sending expensive knives back and forth every 3-4 months simply isn’t an option.

Even with very delicate and careful use, at best in my experience ceramic outlasted steel (Japanese kitchen knives, high hardness) probably twice at best. Time spent to sharpen those ceramics is 3-4 times greater compared to steel, if not more.

So, as much as I like exotic steels and blade materials, ceramics for today is a poor choice for the kitchen knives. May be good for a letter opener, but not in the kitchen.

If you still want to try it out, then I suggest not to buy a set, buy a single knife, test it and then do as you wish. Sets are a bad idea for any blade material anyway, you will get more than one knife that isn’t really needed.

With the exception of Morimoto, Cimarusti and very few other chefs you can safely ignore what they show on food networks. Most of them either have no choice due to sponsorship and contractual agreements, or alternatively have vested interest and promote particular brand, and then it has very little to do with the actual knife performance and quality, e.g. Rachel Ray using her line of Furi knives which are real junk and unlikely to last sharp longer than her 30 min show.

Kyocera ceramic kitchen knife review here – http://zknives.com/knives/kitchen/ktknv/misc/kyoceraok45.shtml

Boker ceramic delta folder review here – http://zknives.com/knives/folding/hiend/bokercd.shtml

Gray fox asked Which is the better knife from cold steel?

I’m in the market for a solid camp/hunting knife and I’ve narrowed my choices down to two knives from cold steel. The Recon 1 tanto partially serrated folding knife. or the partially serrated tanto gunsite knife. I’ve been reading reviews and watching their official videos and I can’t decide which is better for long term hard use. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

And got the following answer:

Buy a tanto bladed knife, and you may as well buy a knife with no tip. The tip is designed to penetrate, not to cut. It is angled all wrong. You would be better off with a clip point, drop point, or skinning type knife, at least you would have a knife where you can use the whole blade.

Cold steel makes some great knives, but buy the right knife for your purpose. Tanto bladed knives are fighting or self-defense knives, and like 90% of the Jeeps out there, are not used for the proper purpose. BTW, if you research Japanese knives, their tanto do not have armor-piercing tips.

I like Cold Steel’s Carbon V knives the best, if it is available in a model to your liking, and if you can keep it clean and well oiled.

theknifeguy asked Can someone help me find out more info on this knife?

I have looked on the web for about an hour and couldn’t find any more information or anyone who had even heard of it.
It is a parker – imai, is made of surgical steel, is a k419, and has a beaver on the blade.

And got the following answer:

Well.according to this(a database of closed ebay auctions) it’s basically a Japanese made copy of a Marbles Knife Co. patent..called a “stag hunter”

http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/parker-imai-not-marbles-folding-hunter-stag

Heidi asked How do I know a ceramic knife is good or bad?

I want to buy a ceramic knife, but i don’t know how to choose. Who could help me?? Thanks!

And got the following answer:

I assume you want ceramic knife for a kitchen use?

There are two major types of ceramics used in blades, Zirconium Oxide and Zirconium Carbide. Zirconium carbide is more dense and tougher material, in short better than Zirconium oxide. Typically, Zirconium carbide blades are black and Oxide are white, although I see nothing that could prevent any maker to color either one in any color. Thus, its best to ask or check the specs and trust the maker.
Other than that, choice is determined with usual knife selection criteria, whatever works for you.

I’ve used/tested several ceramic knives and in my opinion, ceramics is not ready for now to be a knife blade material.

Based on Kyocera(they’re the leader in that area) kitchen knife – http://zknives.com/knives/kitchen/ktknv/misc/kyoceraok45.shtml
YopshiBlade ceramic santoku –
http://zknives.com/knives/kitchen/ktknv/misc/ybstk118.shtml
And Boker ceramic folder – http://zknives.com/knives/folding/hiend/bokercd.shtml
use/sharpening and info exchange with other knife enthusiasts:

1) Ceramic knives can’t get as sharp as quality steel. I have extensive collection of various sharpening equipment, including Japanese whetstones, ceramic and diamond sharpeners. I hand sharpen all of my knives, including ceramics. Like I said, ceramic never gets as sharp as the good steel, and second, the effort spent on sharpening ceramics isn’t worth the little extra edge holding you get from it.

2) Factory edge on ceramic knives is not as sharp as ceramic can be. So far, every single ceramic knife I’ve had, I did sharpen better than the stock edge. I mention this because majority of the people rely on factory edges and sharpening services when buying ceramic knives and it’s not even getting full potential out of the knife edge.

3) Too brittle. Aside from the breakage issues which I haven’t ever experienced, but it’s easily possible, the real issue is the edge microchipping, which dulls the edge severely and really fast.
All that talk about ceramic never needs sharpening is not how things work out in real life. Yes, ceramics is much harder than the steel, even the best steel, but because it doesn’t have enough strength the edge which is a lot thinner, or at least supposed to be thinner than the whole blade chips easily.
I was using ceramic knives exclusively for soft vegetables, always on custom end-grain wood board and still, the blade suffered from chipping. I could see that very well a simple loupe.
Even when you wash those veggies thoroughly, there’s always a good chance small particles of dirt or sand are still on them, especially if you work with potatoes, leeks and such. And that’s how it chips.
On plastic boards things get much worse, because the board itself causes more chipping.

So, contrary to the dealers claims, ceramic knives do blunt, and the irony is, it can happen faster than with the steel knives. Speck of dirt that will chip the ceramic edge will probably bend the steel or chip it, but steel is very easy to fix, ceramics isn’t. Most of the people simply can’t sharpen them at home, and sending expensive knives back and forth every 3-4 months simply isn’t an option, at least not to me.

Even with very delicate and careful use, at best in my experience ceramic outlasted steel (Japanese kitchen knives, high hardness) probably twice at best. Time spent to sharpen those ceramics is 3-4 times greater compared to steel, if not more.

So, as much as I like exotic steels and blade materials, ceramics for today is a poor choice for the kitchen knives. May be good for a letter opener, but not in the kitchen.

If you still want to try it out, then I suggest not to buy a set, buy a single knife, test it and then do as you wish. Sets are a bad idea for any blade material anyway, you will get more than one knife that isn’t really needed.

jar12ro asked What is the best knife (ie. folding or fixed) for under 30-40 dollars?

I’m looking for an EDC knife in either fixed or folding style. I like Japanese blades, large blades (think Cold Steel AK-47) and just general good looks. It doesn’t have to be wonderful, just reasonably good quality. I have a Benchmade HK 14100 Snody and I just want something else that I can just bash around that isn’t that expensive.

And got the following answer:

I’m going to put a list of a few knives I like here:
Folders:
http://www.bladehq.com/item–Boker-Magnum-MW-Micarta–7315
http://www.bladehq.com/item–Gerber-Traverse-Drop–7922
Fixed:
http://www.bladehq.com/item–Cold-Steel-The-Spike–6324
http://www.bladehq.com/item–Gerber-Warrant-Tactical–7382

What my next knife purchase will be:
OTF:
http://www.bladehq.com/item–Schrade-Assisted-Opening–4769

I hope that helps ๐Ÿ™‚
Good Luck!

jaymax173 asked How did people get fires hot enough to melt there metal and heat treat it back in the day?

The asians even had to get carbon hot enough to fold into swards.

And got the following answer:

The japanese used large clay furnaces with bellows, filled with a mixture of iron ore and charcoal, which was burned to make the heat and also supplied the carbon for the steel mixture. This wasn’t hot enough to actually melt the metal, but it did mix the iron and carbon to make steel, which was then pulled out, sorted according to carbon content, and used for knives and swords.

Nova did an documentary about that a few years ago. Pretty interesting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWK-Gzyl6y8

mista wigga asked Is it illegal to own or import a katana in the UAE?

I want to order a katana from bugei or Ryumon into Dubai…but since it isnt a democracy here all imported packages are opened and im afraid that the katana might be confiscated after spending so much money on it….is the katana or large blades in gereneral illegal here in the UAE?

thanks

And got the following answer:

Yeah, it’ll get taken away from you probably. It’ll be so much more fun to learn how to make your own. A piece of railroad track stood up on its end makes a very good anvil, and you can make a pretty good forge with a hole in the ground and a hair dryer. And then all you need is a pair of long tongs and a hammer and a big enough piece of high carbon steel. Circular saw blades are really good for making knives.

For the side blast forge, just dig 2 pits in the ground about 3 feet apart, one pit should be smaller than the other. Connect the two pits with a narrow trench and put a metal pipe in there. The pipe should be just long enough to fit into the trench. Then, duct tape a hair dryer to the end of the pipe sticking out of the smaller pit, put some coke in there (to make coke, take charcoal or bituminous coal, get it to ignite, and then bury the fire so that it burns very slowly for about a week. What you’ll have left is some pure fuel for your forging) light it up, and you’ve got a forge to play with. Then, if you really want to make your katana, just heat the saw blades up and forge weld them together and then beat them into an ingot. This’ll take care of the famous folding crap you hear about in the documentaries and movies. Then, you heat the ingot up until it’s just a tiny bit brighter than cherry red and beat it into the shape of a straight katana, then you quench it in mineral oil or water to cool it off, then you put runny clay along the back side with thin tendrils of clay reaching out to the cutting edge in regular intervals, and then you stick it back into the forge until it’s glowing a dull reddish yellow, and then you quench it again. This creates the characteristic wave markings you see on japanese swords. The reason they do this is because it makes the blade more durable. It provides a sort of shock absorbing core along the backside of the sword while allowing the blade to have a rigid, durable, razor sharp edge.

Anyway, they can stop you from buying it, but they’re gonna have a damned hard time stopping you from going out to the desert with your workshop in tow to make it. It’s a wonder the knife ban in the UK didn’t cause a sharp rise in the backyard blacksmith population.