Expensive Pocket Knives

10 Coolest Gear in 2010

Enjoy outdoor adventures uninterruptedly with outdoor edge knives

If you are thinking of spending a lot
of time outdoors, then you should always carry hunting or outdoor
edge knives. Famously known as survival knives, these sharp cutting
objects are carried by hunters or the people who go for outdoor
activities such as camping, hunting, mountaineering, rafting or
outing in dense forests and natural places that are not frequently
visited by people. These knives are not only useful for hunting
purpose but also for the hunters’ survival from unknown danger.
Hence, these knives serve various purposes.

Fixed blade knives and lockback or
tactical folding knives are the two common types of knives. Although
both types of knives s have their own unique benefits, yet their
selection mainly depends upon your own needs and hunting styles. The
thing that makes a lockback or folding blade knife remarkable and
useful is their one-handed opening feature. It allows your thumb nail
to open the blade instantly. Being smaller in size, these knives are
the best and safest to carry and wear on the belt. Additionally,
these knives cover less space owing their ability to get folded
easily.

On the other hand, fixed
blade tactical knives or hunting knives are more durable and
versatile. That is why they can be effectively used for cutting,
slicing, gutting, piercing and trimming plants as well as animals. A
fixed blade is an invaluable gift for the purpose of wilderness
survival. When hunters or adventure-loving people carry these knives
with them, they can easily clear small bushes, skin small animals and
cut ropes. These knives are carried in a sheath on the belt, leg or
boot to avoid physical injuries. The clip point blade, skinning blade
and the drop point blade are the three common types of blades
primarily used by hunters in their journey to forests. You can easily
find these blades clad in either fixed or hunting knives.

An
elegantly crafted and designed knife can make things easy for you if
you are going to skin the animal or cut up the meat. When your bag
has some sharp knives, you can easily spend every leisure moment in
excitement and adventure. As the quintessential tool for outdoor
adventure and survival situations, the knife serves a symbolic
purpose by providing security. Whether you look for cutting game and
wood, warding off danger, administering first aid or feeling safe,
outdoor edge knives come out to your rescue and overcome your
expectations.

Whether you
choose tactical folding knife or fixed blade knives, make sure your
selection should match your recreational and hunting needs directly.

For more information about Tactical
Folding Knife, please visit: Peaksandvalley.com

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com





Original Source: http://www.articlesfactory.com/articles/sports/enjoy-outdoor-adventures-uninterruptedly-with-outdoor-edge-knives.html


History of Knives<!–

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//–> By Rajkumar Jonnala on February 23, 2010 0

Knives as Tools

Knives have always been an extremely useful tool to have. They are probably one of the only tools that we use daily that were used by our distant ancestors. The Bronze Age brought about the first significant change to knives, though since its softer structure didn’t make the strongest of knives, many still preferred the “older” stone tool. Stone blades and knives really remained the preferred material up until bronze was replaced with iron which was considerably stronger than bronze.

First Improvements

Ancient Greek and Roman civilizations are credited with the first folding knives as well as knives with ivory blades. It’s believed that this was a result of the popularity of cut fruits – ivory blades prevented the transfer of the taste of rust (or metal).

Manufacturing Knives

Between 1095 and 1272 there were a number of Crusades launched by the Europeans. During this time they traveled to all corners of the earth fighting for ground and more. Like so many other conflicts, this created an opportunity. France began its manufacturing of cutlery offering blades of various sizes and shapes and in a variety of materials. France had a corner on the cutlery market (including knives) until about 1789 and even today, you’ll find several cutlery manufacturers still in France.

The “Pocket” Knife

Today’s pocket knife is believed to be started sometime during the 15th Century – again out of necessity. Remember, knives were the main tool at that time, there was no cutlery, as we know it today – people ate their meals with the blades of their knife. This is when it is believed that multiple-blade knives made their first appearance and most likely resulting in more folding knives.

Material Improvements

While most early knives were created from carbon steel (or iron), today’s blades are made of surgical steel, carbon steel or from martensitic stainless steel. What has not changed much is the overall design of knives.

Nearly all collectible knives and Scout knives are created from carbon steel. The reason behind this is believed to be that while this knife can oxidize easily, it’s less expensive to manufacture, it’s very easy to sharpen and once sharpened it has a great edge.

Useful Knives

It seems like today you can find a knife for any purpose including fighting, multi-purpose knives, hunting knives and more. This development really came about during the 19th Century, material was readily available and more people were adept at creating knives. Whether you are looking for a simple purpose knife or a collectible folding knife, today you will have no trouble locating them. Whether your tastes run to plain handles or intricately designed handles, there is a knife available to suit your basic needs, or your desire to collect a piece that displays exquisite workmanship.

Today

Today pocket knives are available for a fraction of the cost of what they used to be. You’ll find people from early teens to older adults, men and women sporting a pocket knife. Because of the impeccable record keeping that began around 1900, collectors have an easier time valuing and dating previously created knives, and particularly those rare hand-crafted ones. Knives are often used for wedding gifts, promotional items and more.

Original Source: http://www.sooperarticles.com/business-articles/marketing-articles/history-knives-45233.html

Expensive Pocket Knives News:

12 Strangest Knives – Oddee.com (cool knives, most expensive knife)

Key Shaped Pocket Knife You have to hold one of these in your hand. Barely larger than an ordinary key, this German made pocket knife will easily slip on your key chain.

Original Source: http://www.oddee.com/item_97049.aspx

Expensive Pocket Knives – Compare Prices, Reviews and Buy at Nextag

Expensive Pocket Knives – 4,182 results like SOG® Specialty Knives & Tools VL-01 Vulcan 3.5″ Knife, Satin, SCHATT & MORGAN Black Lip Pearl Doctor SFO 1/100 Pocket …

Original Source: http://www.nextag.com/expensive-pocket-knives/stores-html#!

What is the most expensive pocket knife in the world? | ChaCha

What is the most expensive pocket knife in the world? ChaCha Answer: There is a Swiss Army knife that is made of pure platinum 950. I…

Original Source: http://www.chacha.com/question/what-is-the-most-expensive-pocket-knife-in-the-world

The Best Pocket Knives | LIVESTRONG.COM

The Best Pocket Knives. Pocket knives are quite handy for many various purposes. If you take your time picking out a top quality pocket knife that has the …

Original Source: http://www.livestrong.com/article/224653-the-best-pocket-knives/

Expensive Pocket Knives – Compare Prices, Reviews and Buy at Nextag

Expensive Pocket Knives – 4,182 results like SOG® Specialty Knives & Tools VL-01 Vulcan 3.5″ Knife, Satin, SCHATT & MORGAN Black Lip Pearl Doctor SFO 1/100 Pocket …

Original Source: http://www.nextag.com/expensive-pocket-knives/stores-html#!


Traditional pocket knives – Böker Plus Bubinga and Hartkopf

Mike is talking about 2 different traditional pocket knives which are superb and not expensive. Over all they look great and perform great. Love both knives …


Ethan Key asked Jeans stained my wooden knife handle?

I have an really expensive pocket knife, that i happened to leave in my jeans pocket when i went somewhere. When i took the knife out the handle was partially stained blue. How can i remove the stain?

And got the following answer:

It depends on what the handle is made up. You might try something like Goo Gone. Start out with a very small amount on a coarse rag. Fabric dye may be impossible to remove. I don’t know if the handle is wood, ivory, plastic, or what. I know this sounds strange, but you may want to take it to a shoe repair shop, or at least call and ask. They may have something that would take it off. They probably are used to removing stains from fabric, leather, maybe even wooden heels or purse handles, etc. . and they may have an all-purpose product that would work. It’s worth a try.

Sam asked Who is the best pocket knife brand maker but isnt horribly expensive?

Im a boyscout and Im looking at assist open knives the only person Ive looked at is sports authority(the woodsmen spring assisted tan pocket knife) and crkt(delegate) i like the delegates look but i cant find one that inexpensive so i was wondering some of you guys could help me out. I would love websites and links and pictures and all that.

And got the following answer:

Well, Buck knives are made in the USA and are a supporter of Scouts on all levels. They are a quality brand and unless you lose the knife, it will serve you a lifetime.

Their 110 model is a classic and hard to beat for utility. Not sure why you think an assist open is needed, but I believe they have those too.

Adam asked What’s the best way to sharpen a 1095 carbon steel blade?

I want to sharpen my katana, but I have no clue how to approach it. I have a diamond file sharpener that I use for my pocket knives and machete…But I don’t know if this would be okay to use on a sword.

And got the following answer:

A knife sharpener would completely destroy the geometry of your edge, and basically ruin your sword. Sharpening a sword is very difficult for beginners since the edge of katana has a unique clam shell shape (see examples here: http://nihonzashi.com/diy_edge_geometry.aspx). An overview of the process can be found here: http://nihonzashi.com/diy_sword_sharpening.aspx

The stones used to sharpen a sword are relatively expensive, and it actually makes more financial sense to send it in to a professional. 1095 steel (depending on how well it was forged) has relatively good edge retention since it has high carbon content, so you shouldn’t need to sharpen it frequently enough to justify the expense – unless it is something you want to learn how to do, though it is common to screw up the first few times you do it.

crooms123 asked Is their a pocket knife for the Swiss Guard?

My family are planning on going to Italy and the Vatican City is one of our stops. Is their a Swiss Guard pocket knife I can buy. That swings back in the handle not like a knife.

And got the following answer:

If you go to the gift shops at vatican city you can definitely find some. Be aware that they are expensive though. they can range from 40- 70 euro at minimum. Go figure.

Amy asked How do you sharpen a serrated knife?

I’m not sure of the spelling, but you get the idea. I have a little Ruko pocket knife that I take camping with me. The top part of the blade is normal smooth, but the bottom half is serrated. Would I sharpen it as a normal kitchen knife on a sharpening stone?

And got the following answer:

I have several knives with serrated edges and I find that the easiest way to sharpen them is with what is called a “crock stick”. It is a pair of ceramic rods that are placed in a block of wood to form a “V”. The edge of the knife is drawn through the sticks to sharpen them. This works only if the knife has not been abused and still has some edge on it. The sticks are not aggressive enough to regrind a spoiled edge but do an excellent job of returning a sharp edge when it is dulled through reasonable use. If your knife edge is still in good condition, and only needs honing the Crock Stick is your answer. If it needs more than that, you may have to find a professional knife sharpening service to bring back the edge for you by regrinding it. You can find Crock Stick or its equivalent in most hardware stores or knife shops. It may not be called that but if you ask for a
Crock Stick, the person at the store will know what you want. The Crock Stick will cost about $5 to $10. Another choice is what is called a Lanskey Sharpener. It does a wonderful job but is a bit more expensive.

crooms123 asked Is their a pocket knife for the Swiss Guard?

My family are planning on going to Italy and the Vatican City is one of our stops. Is their a Swiss Guard pocket knife I can buy. That swings back in the handle not like a knife.

And got the following answer:

If you go to the gift shops at vatican city you can definitely find some. Be aware that they are expensive though. they can range from 40- 70 euro at minimum. Go figure.

deadcow asked Where is a place that I can get my pocket knife professionally sharpened?

Where is a place that I can get my pocket knife professionally sharpened? I’ve heard of places like this were you can bring your pocket knife and have them sharpen it so it’ll cut like butter. I’m failing at sharpening it myself and would so rather have someone else do it professionally. Thanks!

And got the following answer:

Different places provide sharpening services, but. as usual most of them won’t do anything real good, mainly because most of the people out there never seen a good edge and acceptance for sub par sharpening is casual thing.

Really good pros specialize on hi-end knives and probably won’t work on the folder, or the price will be high, which you don’t really want.

Your best bet is local barber shop or restaurant. I don’t mean they do the sharpening job, but they use their services the most. Restaurants unfortunately have lower standards for edge sharpness, but good barbers as usual have very expensive equipment. I’ve seen scissors that were 300-500$ or even higher. You don’t trust that stuff to just anyone. So, they’d be the best source of info if you want to go locally.

Otherwise, I guess you can find someone on the internet, but average rate for sharpening is 3-5$ per inch or fixed rate ~40$ for the knife.
Again, you’d have to know whom to trust and there’s a risk of loosing the knife during shipping back and forth.

Having said all that, it’s the best if you find a junk knife and practice sharpening on that.
Also, I suggest either get the sharpening system which will help you to hold the fixed angle, which is why you’re having problems with sharpening, or alternatively get sandpaper on the mousepad and do it that way. It’s much more forgiving than sharpening stones and will produce very nice convex edges.
Start with something like 220 or 400 grit and gradually move up to 1000-2000 grit. You have to raise the burr with each grit on both sides of the edge before switching t higher grit. That’s pretty much it. Just the key is to hold more or less consistent angle between the edge and the surface.

Here’s more about sharpening equipment – http://zknives.com/knives/sharpening/index.shtml

Ethan Key asked Jeans stained my wooden knife handle?

I have an really expensive pocket knife, that i happened to leave in my jeans pocket when i went somewhere. When i took the knife out the handle was partially stained blue. How can i remove the stain?

And got the following answer:

It depends on what the handle is made up. You might try something like Goo Gone. Start out with a very small amount on a coarse rag. Fabric dye may be impossible to remove. I don’t know if the handle is wood, ivory, plastic, or what. I know this sounds strange, but you may want to take it to a shoe repair shop, or at least call and ask. They may have something that would take it off. They probably are used to removing stains from fabric, leather, maybe even wooden heels or purse handles, etc. . and they may have an all-purpose product that would work. It’s worth a try.