Ceramic Tactical Knives

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Buck Knives History of Hoyt H Buck by James Huff

One of the most trusted names in pocket knives and hunting knives is Buck knives. Buck knives is the name of Quality in the world of knives. Buck knives where created by Hoyt H Buck. Hoyt Buck started making hunting knives as a apprentice in Kansas over 100 years ago. He later moved to Idaho and then started to make knives. After the bombing of Pear Harbor. When the military asked for help to arm the troops Hoyt Buck started to make knives for them to help in the fight, and got knives into the hands of as many troops as he could.

Later he and his son moved Buck knives to San Diego and started making knives on a much larger scale. This is where the Buck knives that we all know was made. It is called the Buck folding hunter and is one of the most copied knives in the world. Witch supports the claim that Buck knives is one of the greatest manufactures in the world and is why Buck knives are second to none.

Buck knives also made a survival knife called the Buckmaster. These knives where made for the military and also one of the knives that you know from the Rambo movies. Later Buck knives where also made for the navy seals. This knife is called the Knighthawk. This is another testament to the quality of Buck knives, one of the best makers of pocket knives, hunting knives, or survival knives world wide. If Buck knives are trusted by the U.S. military then I think that we all can trust them.

Later in 2005 Buck knives moved back to where it all started, back to Idaho where the first knives where made so help the war effort Buck knives has a history of being the best. From the first knives that Hoyt H Buck made to the Buck knives of today when we go hunting or fishing or on our camping trips, and all the knives that have served our young men and young ladies in the military. So if you want the best, buy Buck knives and you cant go wrong. They are just great knives.

Original Source: http://www.articlecity.com/articles/recreation_and_sports/article_3267.shtml


History Collectible Knives Batman Batarang The New Trend By Smith K Lee on October 16, 2012 0

Knives have an important place in our daily lives. Even our ancestors depended on knives to survive. The major evolution in knives manufacturing came during the Bronze Age when soft structured knives were built. However, these new knives were not preferred by the mass as the older stone tools were more durable and functional. Nevertheless, collectible pocket knives, such as Batman Batarang and tac force kniveshave played a vital role for humans.The first evidence of folding knives could be seen from the artifacts collected from the Greek and the Roman civilization. Their society preferred cut fruits and vegetables on their tables and therefore, high quality knives as well as ivory blades were in demand among royals and wealthy individuals.

Today, Knives have become more than just a tool, it has become a necessity. Additionally, there is a new trend and passion among adventures individuals to collect knives, such as batman batarang of various designs, color, and style. Although folding knives were famous and extremely beneficial, there was always a need of special tool. Therefore, during the 15th century, innovators introduced a tool that has won the heart of millions of people: a multifunctional knife, such as the Swiss Army Knife and tac force knife.

In past, most of the knives were made out of carbon steel or in plain words, iron, but today many industrial applications have allowed manufacturer to use high-strength surgical steel and/or stainless steel. However, even today, you will still find knives that have carbon steel blades. The main reason behind the technique is that carbon steel blades are less expensive to produce and they can be sharped easily.

You will have no difficulty in finding a knife that is utilized for a basic purpose or a knife that has a historical value or a fancy collectible batman batarang and tac force knives. There is always knife available that will satisfy your aesthetic needs. One can be interested in buying a knife with a plain handle or a knife with a complicatedly fashioned handle, and he will be able to own one without any trouble. These Batman batarang is double bladed. They are made of stainless steel and utilizes aluminum made handle. The blades are sharp and they a special logo on the handle. These are extremely famous among batman movie fans.

One of the famous brands that has inspired knife enthusiast is Tac Force Knives. They have manufactured some of the best designed knives in the market, and a major advantage is that the prices are extremely affordable. Most of the knives are made of stainless steel, which has a double edged blade. Furthermore, they are categorized as spring assisted knives. The spring motion allows the knife to be easily opened and closed. Some of the blades are half serrated, with Tac Force Knives logo on the blade. This not only makes the design of the knife more appealing, but it provides an extra functionality. They also come with a softly sharp top edge. Although, some knife owners might prefer sharp top, but the reasoning behind this feature is to avoid any physical injury while closing the knife. Most of their knives come with unique design and are available in various colors. Additionally, the inner frame of the knife handle is made of steel and the outer frame is aluminum. Almost, all the tac force knives and batman batarang have these three common features: they have a pocket clip, a seat belt cutter, and a glass breaking end tip.

Original Source: http://www.sooperarticles.com/hobbies-articles/collecting-articles/history-collectible-knives-batman-batarang-new-trend-1087038.html

Ceramic Tactical Knives News:

Boker Knives – Knife Center

… state of the art ceramic blade knives, … as well as the Applegate Fighting Dagger combat knife, Tactical Liner Locking Folding Knives, …

Original Source: http://www.knifecenter.com/knifecenter/boker/

Ceramic Knives at Knife Supply

Ceramic Blade Knives from Knife Supply. … From Pocket Knives and Swiss Army Knives to Hunting Knives and Tactical Knives. – America’s #1 Knife Supply! …

Original Source: http://www.knifesupply.com/ceramic_knives.html

Ceramic Knives – RoadsideImports LLC

ENLARGE: Meyerco Sovereign Ceramic Blackie Collins Tactical Stealth Knife – ON SALE This exclusive Blackie Collins designed knife features a ceramic blade for an …

Original Source: http://www.assistedknife.com/index.cfm/fa/subcategories.main/parentcat/25000/subcatid/59410

Ceramic Knives at Knife Supply

Ceramic Blade Knives from Knife Supply. … From Pocket Knives and Swiss Army Knives to Hunting Knives and Tactical Knives. – America’s #1 Knife Supply! …

Original Source: http://www.knifesupply.com/ceramic_knives.html

Ceramic Knives – RoadsideImports LLC

ENLARGE: Meyerco Sovereign Ceramic Blackie Collins Tactical Stealth Knife – ON SALE This exclusive Blackie Collins designed knife features a ceramic blade for an …

Original Source: http://www.assistedknife.com/index.cfm/fa/subcategories.main/parentcat/25000/subcatid/59410


Ceramic knives

Mastrad's ceramic award-winning paring knives. The Mastrad 3″ paring knife comes with a Zirconium white ceramic blade. Stronger and lighter than hardened ste…


zantaff asked Serrated knives Vs. Plain edge knives?

What’s the difference? Why should I pick one over the other?
I am trying to figure which one to buy.

http://www.manventureoutpost.com/outdoor/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=1178

http://www.manventureoutpost.com/outdoor/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=1179

And got the following answer:

Contrary to the “experts” opinions voiced so far, serrated knives *can not* be maintained by a non-cutler. The entire design of the serrations themselves creates an edge that can NOT be resharpened without damaging the original edge.

Serrations can be “sharpened” either of two ways: one is to use a round file or ceramic rod to hit each and every groove in the serrated blade. That requires that your rod be the exact same diameter as the one that serrations were originally cut with. If it’s not the exact same diam, it will widen the serration’s teeth on every sharpening. You’ll go from say, nine serrations to eight slightly wider ones. Seven even wider ones etc. But even if the stone/rod/file is exactly the same diam as the original tool, the tool will tend to cut the serrations deeper into the blade without truly sharpening any of them. Serrated blades can be thought of as disposable blades because of that.

Tactical knives like those you pointed out can only be used one way. A straight fist grip with the edge away from you. That makes cutting rope pretty easy (the usual example given to why you need that particular knife), but how many folks buy a pocketknife to cut rope? In everything besides cutting rope, that design is garbage. It won’t fit your hand to peel an apple. It won’t fit your hand to clean your nails. It won’t fit your hand to cut a steak. It won’t fit your hand to open an envelope etc. It’s only good for that one thing….cutting rope.

My suggestion is you skip the tactical crap and go for an Old Timer or a Buck or an Uncle Henry etc.

Addendum Brewmeister: You *can* technically sharpen serrations, Brew. Yes. But as I said, you can’t maintain a serrated edge as is and you can’t sharpen one without damaging or totally destroying the original edge. It can’t be done.

Try this as an exercise, bud….use a ruler and a quarter and draw yourself a line of say, ten serrations onto a sheet of printer paper. Get them straight. Just use your ruler and coin to draw ten circles side by side. Next, use your ruler again and draw a line through the points of your serrations about oh, 1/8″ of the way so that there’s 1/8″ of the points drawn through. That’s damaged/dull serrations. Next, use your ruler and that same quarter to redraw your serrations to the point that they have actual points again. How much steel did you have to grind off? Redrawing the serrations is you sharpening them.

Serrations can *only* be “sharpened one of two ways….either you cut them deeper into the blade or you cut them wider. Both methods destroy the original factory edge.

Tanner asked Blackhack Crucible II Folder vs SOG Aegis?

they both have a similar appearance but i was wondering which is more durable, stays sharp longer, and other such qualities a good tactical pocket knife has such as assisted opening. i dont think the crucible has assisted opening.

And got the following answer:

Tanner I picked up a SOG several years ago and I would recommend it over the crucible. I only have to touch the blade up once in a while with a ceramic.

camasap asked Looking for the best tactical/all around folding knife?

I have been looking for the best all around/tactical folding knife for some time now, and I have been unsuccessful in my search. I want something from a respectable brand, made in America, and price is not an issue. I don’t want anything with a serrated edge. Also a big plus is a lighter weight, and thinness. Any help on this topic would be appreciated. Also does anyone know if ceramic blades are good? Thanks!

And got the following answer:

Benchmade is a great knife. I have carried a Benchmade CQC7 since 1998. It still works great, the hing is tight, the blade is easy to keep sharp. I can open it with one handed, either hand.

In today’s catalog the Benchmade® Mini Rukus® – Plain Edge looks good. Oh, it’s not a mini, the blade is 3.4″ long. I have not had a reason to send the knife in for service, but I have read that their service is very good.

Hope this helps.

zantaff asked Serrated knives Vs. Plain edge knives?

What’s the difference? Why should I pick one over the other?
I am trying to figure which one to buy.

http://www.manventureoutpost.com/outdoor/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=1178

http://www.manventureoutpost.com/outdoor/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=1179

And got the following answer:

Contrary to the “experts” opinions voiced so far, serrated knives *can not* be maintained by a non-cutler. The entire design of the serrations themselves creates an edge that can NOT be resharpened without damaging the original edge.

Serrations can be “sharpened” either of two ways: one is to use a round file or ceramic rod to hit each and every groove in the serrated blade. That requires that your rod be the exact same diameter as the one that serrations were originally cut with. If it’s not the exact same diam, it will widen the serration’s teeth on every sharpening. You’ll go from say, nine serrations to eight slightly wider ones. Seven even wider ones etc. But even if the stone/rod/file is exactly the same diam as the original tool, the tool will tend to cut the serrations deeper into the blade without truly sharpening any of them. Serrated blades can be thought of as disposable blades because of that.

Tactical knives like those you pointed out can only be used one way. A straight fist grip with the edge away from you. That makes cutting rope pretty easy (the usual example given to why you need that particular knife), but how many folks buy a pocketknife to cut rope? In everything besides cutting rope, that design is garbage. It won’t fit your hand to peel an apple. It won’t fit your hand to clean your nails. It won’t fit your hand to cut a steak. It won’t fit your hand to open an envelope etc. It’s only good for that one thing….cutting rope.

My suggestion is you skip the tactical crap and go for an Old Timer or a Buck or an Uncle Henry etc.

Addendum Brewmeister: You *can* technically sharpen serrations, Brew. Yes. But as I said, you can’t maintain a serrated edge as is and you can’t sharpen one without damaging or totally destroying the original edge. It can’t be done.

Try this as an exercise, bud….use a ruler and a quarter and draw yourself a line of say, ten serrations onto a sheet of printer paper. Get them straight. Just use your ruler and coin to draw ten circles side by side. Next, use your ruler again and draw a line through the points of your serrations about oh, 1/8″ of the way so that there’s 1/8″ of the points drawn through. That’s damaged/dull serrations. Next, use your ruler and that same quarter to redraw your serrations to the point that they have actual points again. How much steel did you have to grind off? Redrawing the serrations is you sharpening them.

Serrations can *only* be “sharpened one of two ways….either you cut them deeper into the blade or you cut them wider. Both methods destroy the original factory edge.

camasap asked Looking for the best tactical/all around folding knife?

I have been looking for the best all around/tactical folding knife for some time now, and I have been unsuccessful in my search. I want something from a respectable brand, made in America, and price is not an issue. I don’t want anything with a serrated edge. Also a big plus is a lighter weight, and thinness. Any help on this topic would be appreciated. Also does anyone know if ceramic blades are good? Thanks!

And got the following answer:

Benchmade is a great knife. I have carried a Benchmade CQC7 since 1998. It still works great, the hing is tight, the blade is easy to keep sharp. I can open it with one handed, either hand.

In today’s catalog the Benchmade® Mini Rukus® – Plain Edge looks good. Oh, it’s not a mini, the blade is 3.4″ long. I have not had a reason to send the knife in for service, but I have read that their service is very good.

Hope this helps.