Best Benchmade Knife

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Choosing The Right Hunting Knife by Wayne Foster

Choosing the right hunting knife can be a difficult challenge. If you choose wrong you end up with a paperweight that is more likely to end up in your junk-drawer than on your hip when you need it.

First ask yourself a few questions: What kind of hunting do you do? Do you go after big game or small? Do you trophy hunt or do you meat hunt only? What is the largest animal you envision using the knife on? The smallest? How often do you hunt, are you looking for a knife you can easily carry when you are not hunting?

Seems like a lot of questions but if you don’t know what you are looking for, you will never find the correct one for your personal preferences.

Stainless versus Carbon Steel

This is far too short an article to get into the metallurgy of steel composition. Lets just say that some steels are too soft to hold an edge very well. Some are so hard as to be almost impossible to sharpen in the field. Do some research into the various steels and their grades. Sometimes the difference between a carrier and a drawer-sitter is the blade material.

Folding versus Fixed Blades

Let’s look at the two basic knife styles: fixed and folding blade. A fixed blade knife is just that, fixed in place. Meaning that the blade is permanently fixed in the open position. Due to this design, these knives normally come with a sheath so they can be carried safely. These knives are normally stronger than the folding variety because the steel of the blade runs into or through the handle.

There are no moving parts with a fixed blade knife so they are very reliable. Several manufacturers also produce hunting knives that allow the user to change the blades very quickly.

Folding knives have a pivot point and lock mechanism which allows the blade to close into the handle. A folding knife without the lock should not even be considered for hunting. These are more for the occasional hunter who may also want to carry the knife for daily use. Folding knives are not as strong as a fixed blade by design. However, they are much easier to carry in a pocket or on the belt in a small sheath.

Blade Styles

The next issue we’ll address will be blade style. The four main hunting blade designs are the drop point, clip point, skinning, and caping designs.

Drop Point

The drop point knife is an excellent design for the big game hunter. This design generally features a robust, curved blade of relatively thick steel. These features allow the user to cut the skin off the animal using the entire edge of the knife, rather than just the point. This allows for quick skinning and very little damage to the meat. The design of the drop point also allows for other field cleaning tasks such as gutting and the splitting of the rib cage or pelvis, although a saw or hatchet is the preferred method for the latter two tasks.

Clip Point

Another style of hunting knife is the clip point. The clip point has a somewhat thinner blade than the drop point and has a much more defined point. Most bowies are examples of clip point knives. The flatter blade is more utilitarian in nature and will fit the needs of the majority of hunters, especially those wishing to use the knife as a general duty work knife and not a dedicated hunting knife. The clip point design will perform all of the tasks the drop point will, only not as efficiently. For the occasional hunter this is the perfect design.

Skinning

The skinning knife is designed to aid in the removal of the skin of big game animals. They tend to have a highly sweeping blades that are designed to effortlessly separate the flesh from the skin. A dedicated skinning knife can be a real time saver for those big game hunters that do the butchering themselves. An added bonus is that the skinning knife can do most of the other game cleaning chores as well as the clip point or the drop point designs.

You will be able to view more information at http://www.gamebird-hunter.com/hunting-knife.html

Caping

A knife that is often overlooked is the caping knife. It is used for “caping” big game animals for mounting. When preparing a trophy for the taxidermist, it is important that the hide be preserved for a neck or shoulder mount. Some beautiful trophy animals have been ruined by a hunter using the wrong knife to prepare the animal. Caping knives are dedicated to this task. They are a relatively small knife with a very fine blade.

A note about caping is in order. Do not wait until you have an 1100 pound 6 by 6 elk down to attempt caping for the first time. Practice on smaller animals before you try it on your trophy. It would be a shame to have to to to an antler or skull mount because you messed up. Caping is not difficult, but to do it well requires practice.

Gut Hook Variation

One of the variables you will see in blade design is the gut hook pattern. The gut hook is used by making a small incision with the main blade and then by using the hook to cut open the abdomen. The hook prevents the hunter from “paunching” the animal and possibly affecting the quality of the meat. They do work and it is strictly a matter of personal preference as to the need for one. In the event that you do want the added security that the gut hook provides, they are very similar in price to non-gut hook knives. Be careful when using the gut hook for field dressing. A slip upwards on the handle is an occasion for stitches.

An alternative to purchasing a knife with a gut hook blade is to purchase a separate unit. Some manufacturers offer relatively inexpensive, easily transported units with replaceable blades.

Handle Material

Many hunters put a lot of thought into the blade design of their hunting knife, but put very little thought into the material of the handle. The classic wood, bone, or leather handles are very functional and appealing to the eye. However, don’t overlook the newer handle materials, although not as pleasing to the eye, rubber and other composites merit a look. The newer handle materials offer greatly enhanced control in adverse conditions offering the hunter a greater degree of safety.

Sheath Material

After the blade material, blade design, and handle material are decided, we now move on to the sheath or scabbard. Again, traditional leather is very functional and pleasing to the eye, however, in damp or wet conditions the man-made materials are much more durable. The chemicals used to tan leather will stain most carbon steels and some stainless steels. If you opt for leather, do not store your knife for long periods in the sheath.

Final Thoughts

Your choice of a hunting knife is a very personal one. That being said, you may decide a single knife will not do everything you need to do on your hunt. You might opt for one of the multi knife packs offered by some manufacturers. These are an option bearing in mind that you will have to carry them with you to be of any service.

Happy Hunting!

Original Source: http://www.articlecity.com/articles/recreation_and_sports/article_2595.shtml


History of Knives By Rajkumar Jonnala on February 23, 2010 0

Knives as Tools

Knives have always been an extremely useful tool to have. They are probably one of the only tools that we use daily that were used by our distant ancestors. The Bronze Age brought about the first significant change to knives, though since its softer structure didn’t make the strongest of knives, many still preferred the “older” stone tool. Stone blades and knives really remained the preferred material up until bronze was replaced with iron which was considerably stronger than bronze.

First Improvements

Ancient Greek and Roman civilizations are credited with the first folding knives as well as knives with ivory blades. It’s believed that this was a result of the popularity of cut fruits – ivory blades prevented the transfer of the taste of rust (or metal).

Manufacturing Knives

Between 1095 and 1272 there were a number of Crusades launched by the Europeans. During this time they traveled to all corners of the earth fighting for ground and more. Like so many other conflicts, this created an opportunity. France began its manufacturing of cutlery offering blades of various sizes and shapes and in a variety of materials. France had a corner on the cutlery market (including knives) until about 1789 and even today, you’ll find several cutlery manufacturers still in France.

The “Pocket” Knife

Today’s pocket knife is believed to be started sometime during the 15th Century – again out of necessity. Remember, knives were the main tool at that time, there was no cutlery, as we know it today – people ate their meals with the blades of their knife. This is when it is believed that multiple-blade knives made their first appearance and most likely resulting in more folding knives.

Material Improvements

While most early knives were created from carbon steel (or iron), today’s blades are made of surgical steel, carbon steel or from martensitic stainless steel. What has not changed much is the overall design of knives.

Nearly all collectible knives and Scout knives are created from carbon steel. The reason behind this is believed to be that while this knife can oxidize easily, it’s less expensive to manufacture, it’s very easy to sharpen and once sharpened it has a great edge.

Useful Knives

It seems like today you can find a knife for any purpose including fighting, multi-purpose knives, hunting knives and more. This development really came about during the 19th Century, material was readily available and more people were adept at creating knives. Whether you are looking for a simple purpose knife or a collectible folding knife, today you will have no trouble locating them. Whether your tastes run to plain handles or intricately designed handles, there is a knife available to suit your basic needs, or your desire to collect a piece that displays exquisite workmanship.

Today

Today pocket knives are available for a fraction of the cost of what they used to be. You’ll find people from early teens to older adults, men and women sporting a pocket knife. Because of the impeccable record keeping that began around 1900, collectors have an easier time valuing and dating previously created knives, and particularly those rare hand-crafted ones. Knives are often used for wedding gifts, promotional items and more.

Original Source: http://www.sooperarticles.com/business-articles/marketing-articles/history-knives-45233.html

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Find great deals on eBay for benchmade knife and benchmade knife used. … or Best Offer. Free shipping. Newly listed Benchmade Pardue Axis Plain Edge Knife 530.

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EDC Knives is a knife dealer intent on locating the highest quality custom knives, production knives and gear available. EDC is a premier knife dealer, balisong …

Original Source: http://www.edcknives.com/brands/Benchmade-Knives.html

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Benchmade knives

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clfloyd asked Which benchmade knives have pocket clips that are compatible with the osborne 940?

I bought a Benchmade Osborne 940 and want to change out the pocket clip. Which other benchmade knife models have pocket clips that are compatible with the 940?

And got the following answer:

Have you tried Benchmade’s website?

zeus664 asked What is the lightest and best overall Benchmade knife out there?

I already own a Benchmade Osborne 960s, but is there anything better?
-Thank you for any input.

And got the following answer:

I’ve worked in the cutlery industry for awhile, and know many of the guys at the various companies. Honestly though it depends on what your using it for, what sort of blade geometry do you need? I personally prefer the Benchmade 530 Pardue if lightweight and pure functionality are your desires, and your set on a Benchmade. Also I’d highly recommend Kershaw’s range of Blur Speed Safe knives. I love Benchmade, but find more and more a Kershaw is always in my pocket.

One last note The toughest knife I have ever carried, that is as sharp as the day I got it, been beaten dropped in mud and water and always come back for more, is my Puma 200 series “General”. The older Puma knives esp. match anything made by ANYONE in my book. But no it’s not lightweight. The knives that take the most abuse tend to still be heavier.

Brian asked What would be a nice knife as a gift?

I am currently looking at some Benchmade knives, but they are either too expensive or not effective enough for self-defense. I only know of two other companies (Spyderco, Cold-Steel) and they are not the type of knives I am interested in purchasing. Do you know any good quality knife companies that I can take a look at? If so, I would very much appreciate it.

And got the following answer:

If your looking for a quality knife that won’t let you down at an affordable price since its a gift I would look at gerber for sure there very nice ranging from $20-$300. There is one I’ve had my eye on for a while its fixed blade and has a sharpener in the sheath for $100 and it has a sick look to it!

asked Who makes a Benchmade quality balisong other than Benchmade?

I’m just looking to maybe invest in a better quality balisong, i have a cheepo one now and its time for an upgrade and i was just wondering if there were any other companies that made a Benchmade quality knife. I’m not concerned about the price just yet just i don’t love any of the Benchmades. I dont like spyderco either. Thanks!

And got the following answer:

29 Knives makes balisongs that are incredible quality.
http://www.edcknives.com/vcom/index.php?cPath=1_24&osCsid=ef94c69482e3d3b4f5cdee33a0461f7d

You might look at the Bradley Kimura II if those prices terrify you (they should ๐Ÿ™‚
http://www.knifecenter.com/kc_new/store_detail.html?s=BRAD5500II

gochenour_jarvis asked What is the best benchmade knife for hunting?

There are too many models for me to choose from. I’m looking for the sharpest knife i can find that is good for skinning a deer and/or elk.

And got the following answer:

For a skinning knife I prefer a fixed blade. I don’t like a folder because the blood gets in the works and creates a bacteria farm. It is much harder to thoroughly clean a folder than a fixed blade.

I prefer a textured synthetic grip that won’t slip when bloody.

I prefer a drop point, it works best.

I have one made by Buck, it works well

here is a Benchmade for twice the price
http://www.joessportinggoods.us/61095313388.html

clfloyd asked Which benchmade knives have pocket clips that are compatible with the osborne 940?

I bought a Benchmade Osborne 940 and want to change out the pocket clip. Which other benchmade knife models have pocket clips that are compatible with the 940?

And got the following answer:

Have you tried Benchmade’s website?