Automatic Folding Knife

Automatic Folding Knives

Choosing The Right Hunting Knife by Wayne Foster

Choosing the right hunting knife can be a difficult challenge. If you choose wrong you end up with a paperweight that is more likely to end up in your junk-drawer than on your hip when you need it.

First ask yourself a few questions: What kind of hunting do you do? Do you go after big game or small? Do you trophy hunt or do you meat hunt only? What is the largest animal you envision using the knife on? The smallest? How often do you hunt, are you looking for a knife you can easily carry when you are not hunting?

Seems like a lot of questions but if you don’t know what you are looking for, you will never find the correct one for your personal preferences.

Stainless versus Carbon Steel

This is far too short an article to get into the metallurgy of steel composition. Lets just say that some steels are too soft to hold an edge very well. Some are so hard as to be almost impossible to sharpen in the field. Do some research into the various steels and their grades. Sometimes the difference between a carrier and a drawer-sitter is the blade material.

Folding versus Fixed Blades

Let’s look at the two basic knife styles: fixed and folding blade. A fixed blade knife is just that, fixed in place. Meaning that the blade is permanently fixed in the open position. Due to this design, these knives normally come with a sheath so they can be carried safely. These knives are normally stronger than the folding variety because the steel of the blade runs into or through the handle.

There are no moving parts with a fixed blade knife so they are very reliable. Several manufacturers also produce hunting knives that allow the user to change the blades very quickly.

Folding knives have a pivot point and lock mechanism which allows the blade to close into the handle. A folding knife without the lock should not even be considered for hunting. These are more for the occasional hunter who may also want to carry the knife for daily use. Folding knives are not as strong as a fixed blade by design. However, they are much easier to carry in a pocket or on the belt in a small sheath.

Blade Styles

The next issue we’ll address will be blade style. The four main hunting blade designs are the drop point, clip point, skinning, and caping designs.

Drop Point

The drop point knife is an excellent design for the big game hunter. This design generally features a robust, curved blade of relatively thick steel. These features allow the user to cut the skin off the animal using the entire edge of the knife, rather than just the point. This allows for quick skinning and very little damage to the meat. The design of the drop point also allows for other field cleaning tasks such as gutting and the splitting of the rib cage or pelvis, although a saw or hatchet is the preferred method for the latter two tasks.

Clip Point

Another style of hunting knife is the clip point. The clip point has a somewhat thinner blade than the drop point and has a much more defined point. Most bowies are examples of clip point knives. The flatter blade is more utilitarian in nature and will fit the needs of the majority of hunters, especially those wishing to use the knife as a general duty work knife and not a dedicated hunting knife. The clip point design will perform all of the tasks the drop point will, only not as efficiently. For the occasional hunter this is the perfect design.

Skinning

The skinning knife is designed to aid in the removal of the skin of big game animals. They tend to have a highly sweeping blades that are designed to effortlessly separate the flesh from the skin. A dedicated skinning knife can be a real time saver for those big game hunters that do the butchering themselves. An added bonus is that the skinning knife can do most of the other game cleaning chores as well as the clip point or the drop point designs.

You will be able to view more information at http://www.gamebird-hunter.com/hunting-knife.html

Caping

A knife that is often overlooked is the caping knife. It is used for “caping” big game animals for mounting. When preparing a trophy for the taxidermist, it is important that the hide be preserved for a neck or shoulder mount. Some beautiful trophy animals have been ruined by a hunter using the wrong knife to prepare the animal. Caping knives are dedicated to this task. They are a relatively small knife with a very fine blade.

A note about caping is in order. Do not wait until you have an 1100 pound 6 by 6 elk down to attempt caping for the first time. Practice on smaller animals before you try it on your trophy. It would be a shame to have to to to an antler or skull mount because you messed up. Caping is not difficult, but to do it well requires practice.

Gut Hook Variation

One of the variables you will see in blade design is the gut hook pattern. The gut hook is used by making a small incision with the main blade and then by using the hook to cut open the abdomen. The hook prevents the hunter from “paunching” the animal and possibly affecting the quality of the meat. They do work and it is strictly a matter of personal preference as to the need for one. In the event that you do want the added security that the gut hook provides, they are very similar in price to non-gut hook knives. Be careful when using the gut hook for field dressing. A slip upwards on the handle is an occasion for stitches.

An alternative to purchasing a knife with a gut hook blade is to purchase a separate unit. Some manufacturers offer relatively inexpensive, easily transported units with replaceable blades.

Handle Material

Many hunters put a lot of thought into the blade design of their hunting knife, but put very little thought into the material of the handle. The classic wood, bone, or leather handles are very functional and appealing to the eye. However, don’t overlook the newer handle materials, although not as pleasing to the eye, rubber and other composites merit a look. The newer handle materials offer greatly enhanced control in adverse conditions offering the hunter a greater degree of safety.

Sheath Material

After the blade material, blade design, and handle material are decided, we now move on to the sheath or scabbard. Again, traditional leather is very functional and pleasing to the eye, however, in damp or wet conditions the man-made materials are much more durable. The chemicals used to tan leather will stain most carbon steels and some stainless steels. If you opt for leather, do not store your knife for long periods in the sheath.

Final Thoughts

Your choice of a hunting knife is a very personal one. That being said, you may decide a single knife will not do everything you need to do on your hunt. You might opt for one of the multi knife packs offered by some manufacturers. These are an option bearing in mind that you will have to carry them with you to be of any service.

Happy Hunting!

Original Source: http://www.articlecity.com/articles/recreation_and_sports/article_2595.shtml


History of Knives By Rajkumar Jonnala on February 23, 2010 0

Knives as Tools

Knives have always been an extremely useful tool to have. They are probably one of the only tools that we use daily that were used by our distant ancestors. The Bronze Age brought about the first significant change to knives, though since its softer structure didn’t make the strongest of knives, many still preferred the “older” stone tool. Stone blades and knives really remained the preferred material up until bronze was replaced with iron which was considerably stronger than bronze.

First Improvements

Ancient Greek and Roman civilizations are credited with the first folding knives as well as knives with ivory blades. It’s believed that this was a result of the popularity of cut fruits – ivory blades prevented the transfer of the taste of rust (or metal).

Manufacturing Knives

Between 1095 and 1272 there were a number of Crusades launched by the Europeans. During this time they traveled to all corners of the earth fighting for ground and more. Like so many other conflicts, this created an opportunity. France began its manufacturing of cutlery offering blades of various sizes and shapes and in a variety of materials. France had a corner on the cutlery market (including knives) until about 1789 and even today, you’ll find several cutlery manufacturers still in France.

The “Pocket” Knife

Today’s pocket knife is believed to be started sometime during the 15th Century – again out of necessity. Remember, knives were the main tool at that time, there was no cutlery, as we know it today – people ate their meals with the blades of their knife. This is when it is believed that multiple-blade knives made their first appearance and most likely resulting in more folding knives.

Material Improvements

While most early knives were created from carbon steel (or iron), today’s blades are made of surgical steel, carbon steel or from martensitic stainless steel. What has not changed much is the overall design of knives.

Nearly all collectible knives and Scout knives are created from carbon steel. The reason behind this is believed to be that while this knife can oxidize easily, it’s less expensive to manufacture, it’s very easy to sharpen and once sharpened it has a great edge.

Useful Knives

It seems like today you can find a knife for any purpose including fighting, multi-purpose knives, hunting knives and more. This development really came about during the 19th Century, material was readily available and more people were adept at creating knives. Whether you are looking for a simple purpose knife or a collectible folding knife, today you will have no trouble locating them. Whether your tastes run to plain handles or intricately designed handles, there is a knife available to suit your basic needs, or your desire to collect a piece that displays exquisite workmanship.

Today

Today pocket knives are available for a fraction of the cost of what they used to be. You’ll find people from early teens to older adults, men and women sporting a pocket knife. Because of the impeccable record keeping that began around 1900, collectors have an easier time valuing and dating previously created knives, and particularly those rare hand-crafted ones. Knives are often used for wedding gifts, promotional items and more.

Original Source: http://www.sooperarticles.com/business-articles/marketing-articles/history-knives-45233.html

Automatic Folding Knife News:

automatic knives in Folding Knives | eBay

Find automatic knives from a vast selection of Folding Knives on eBay!

Original Source: http://www.ebay.com/sch/Folding-Knives-/43328/i.html?_nkw=automatic+knives

automatic folding knives | eBay – Electronics, Cars, Fashion …

Find great deals on eBay for automatic folding knives and automatic knives. Shop with confidence.

Original Source: http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=automatic+folding+knives

Automatic Knives and Switchblades – KnifeCenter

We offer automatic knives ( switchblades ) to members of the Armed Forces and Law Enforcement or Government personnel

Original Source: http://www.knifecenter.com/knifecenter/index/autos.html

SOG Knives – always free shipping | BladeOps.com

Find your favorite Automatic, Folding & Specialty SOG Knives at BladeOps.com. Order one today and take advantage of our free shipping.

Original Source: http://www.bladeops.com/SOG-Knives-from-BladeOps-com-s/24.htm

Automatic Knives and Switchblades – KnifeCenter

We offer automatic knives ( switchblades ) to members of the Armed Forces and Law Enforcement or Government personnel

Original Source: http://www.knifecenter.com/knifecenter/index/autos.html


Darrel Ralph DDR TAS Automatic Folding Knife

http://www.customtacticals.com – Darrel Ralph designed TAS Custom Stiletto-style automatic folder. Beautiful machined hard annodized aluminum handles. Very c…


Kangri asked Can you carry a double folding knife in New York?

I have a Smith and Wesson double folding pocket knife, just like the one in this link:
http://www.swordsswords.com/smith-and-wesson-double-lockback-folding-knife.aspx

Its completely manual, not an automatic or switchblade or anything like that. Both blades are 3 inches long.
Can I carry this around if I live in New York and if I leave it exposed?

And got the following answer:

I would think that unless you were in a protected area (Courthouse or Airport or thew like) there would be no problem. It seems like a nasty looking pocket knife. I wouldn’t advertise it but I wouldn’t hide it either if asked.

ikilledkenny84 asked What is the legal max blade length of spring assisted knives in California?

I want to buy a really sweet knife I found on bladeplay.com. I know that spring assisted knives are legal in California due to bill SB 274, but is there a maximum blade length for these knives in California?

And got the following answer:

Knife Carry Related Laws
– California penal code has two main sections interesting to us in this discussion: 653K and 12020. 653K belongs to the section 639-653.2 – Of Other And Miscellaneous Offenses and 12020 belongs to the section 12020-12040 – Unlawful Carrying and Possession of Weapons, that is in the link provided at the beginning of this paragraph. Penal code 653K defines what is a legal pocket knife and what is a switchblade and gravity or ballisong knife. Pocket knives, most likely that’d be a folding knife are legal, while switchblades, gravity and ballisong knives are illegal. Penal code 12020 deals with the street carry laws. There are other penal codes dealing with knife carry in specific places. Those are: penal code 626.10 which deals with the knife school carry rules. There is also penal code 171.b which deals with the knives in public buildings.

Simply put, the law defines what is illegal, so if your knife and carry isn’t what the law defines as illegal you should be fine. Once again, keep in mind the local laws. Details below.
Very Short Summary

State California allows for concealed carry of the folding knives and there is no limit to the blade length. As long as the knife is not banned by PC 653K it is legal. 653K does not make Assisted Openers(AO) illegal. However, depending on the particular AO mechanism and other details some AOs may fall under switchblade category. Kershaw Speed Safe is not one of them, it is perfectly legal, details further down. As far as the state law goes, fixed blades must be carried openly, in the sheath, on the waist. I can’t find where does the law ban either double edged blades or dirks and daggers. As the wording is, those are ok for open carry. No knives longer than 2.5″in the school, but folders are ok in the Universities and Colleges. Unless, they were banned by local authorities. No knives longer than 4″ in public buildings or buildings open to public meetings, e.g. courts, city halls, police stations, city council meetings, etc.
Penal Codes

653K
– Defines legal and illegal pocket knives. Full text of the penal code 653K. The most interesting part of the penal code is the following definition of the switchblade knives:

For the purposes of this section, “switchblade knife” means a knife having the appearance of a pocketknife and includes a spring-blade knife, snap-blade knife, gravity knife or any other similar type knife, the blade or blades of which are two or more inches in length and which can be released automatically by a flick of a button, pressure on the handle, flip of the wrist or other mechanical device, or is released by the weight of the blade or by any type of mechanism whatsoever.

Basically, this section outlaws switchblades, or automatic knives, plus ballisongs, or butterfly knives. Also whatever else can be opened with the flick of the wrist. However, there are lots of legitimate knives that also fall under that category. Next section clarifies that part:

jjjoeseph asked Has anyone ever heard of the boker automatic folding knife?

Is the automatic folding knife like a switchblade does it open up fast when you press the button?
please awnser!!? :]
who ever awnsers first gets best awnser!!!!!

And got the following answer:

Never heard of it.

Yes it’s a switchblade type knife, it opens at the push of a button using a coil spring.

bballjames16 asked Is there an age limit to buy small folding knives?

I live in NY and I want to buy a small folding knife I saw at walmart. I don’t think that my mother will allow me to buy it as she doesn’t want me to get into any trouble with it. ( Which I won’t ) So is there an age limit to buy small folding knifes? ( I’m aware it is illegal to purchase automatic knifes and switchblades but that’s not what I’m asking )

And got the following answer:

no, there’s no age limit

EveDeclara asked What is the difference between assisted opening knives and flick ones?

I’m buying a present for a friend who likes knives but where I live flick knives are apparently illegal but spring assisted aren’t.

Could someone please tell me the difference?

Thanks

And got the following answer:

There are three main types of folding knives:
1) “Pocket” knives- in these knives the blades are under no tension, and are opened entirely by the force you apply to them, the only time I have ever heard of legal complications with these knives are when the blade is too long. These knives tend cover a broad spectrum of prices, qualities and styles.

2) Assissted open knives- in these knives there is a spring or small piece of metal to keep the blade under tension when it is folded. To open these ou apply some pressure as if you were opening a flick knife and let the energy from the spring throw the blade open. The thing with these knives that make them legal to own in more places then automatic knives is that you still open them as if they didn’t have a spring in them. The spring is really only there to assist in deployment.
These knives do run into a fair amount legal red tape because of the easy, and speed of deployment.

3)Automatic knives- These are knives where the blade is under tension again but they are deployed by using a button, because the blade more often then not is concealed inside the handle. These knives are illegal far more frequently then the first two kinds, They’re usually used as a defensive weapon and the blade size and shape reflects that. These are probably what you are reffering to as “flick” knives.

Nin Mushu asked What are indiana’s laws about carrying knives?

I’ve looked online and can not find a for sure answer. I know they can not be automatic (opens with a spring), but what are the details?! Like, how short does the blade have to be, does it have to be a folding knife or does it have to be fixed to the handle, does it have to be a smooth edged blade or would it matter if it was serrated (don’t know if i spelled that right)??? Any factual answers or links to websites to find the right answers would be grately apreciated!

And got the following answer:

Indiana has some of the most relaxed laws on knife carry in the US. You can carry any knife you darn well please so long as it is not a switchblade, ballistic knife (goofy Soviet knife that shoots it’s blade) or a ninja star. This might be why you have having trouble finding the laws: There isn’t anything to find.

Here’s the state government’s website which is the absolute source on the law:
http://www.in.gov/legislative/ic/code/title35/ar47/ch5.html

There’s actually a bill in the legislature as well speak to repeal the ban on switchblades and throwing stars too, so if it passes you can carry any sharp thing you want, so long as it’s not at school and there is no city law against it.

abc1234 asked What are the knives generally used in street fighting?

Often you will see gang members, or punks with them. They pop out with like a button hit or something like that ( i am knife stupid) but they are mainly used for protection. Nothing serious of a knife, just generally used on the streets.

And got the following answer:

Well some good attempts… but not so much knife savvy people.

First off anything that pops or springs open through a button is called an Automatic. (versus Manual).

Switchblades aren’t really used that often unless you are talking about movies from the 60’s. Gang members and punks generally carry guns now a days.

Stillettos are what you would call “Out the Front” Automatics, or instead of swinging from the side (like your average folder) the blade pops out the front.

Keep in mind very few states allow any automatics legally, and therefore they aren’t nearly as easy as States that do allow them.

There are also “assisted opening” knives, knives that require the slightest pressure in opening and they spring open.

In all honesty, every time I have ever been confronted on the streets with a knife it is generally of the regular folding knife variety, which 90% of rednecks carry. (Check the right hand pocket for the clip) Anyone who actually knows how to use knives generally does not want a knife that shows a lot, and will never brandish it or threaten with it.

People who actually use knives, keep them concealed until the moment of impact, and they repeatedly stab you.

One of the best ways of knowing if someone knows what they are doing is if they show you a knife. That just proves them to be a moron.

Also, WTF are people talking about butterfly knives for? Most people do not carry butterfly knives, most gang members certainly don’t, nor do your average street punk. Nor does anyone with a modicrum of sense about knives. They require too much to open, flashy movement aside, they are cumbersome, and unstable, and most of all a pain in the @ss to get to. You have to reach into a pocket or what have you to pull it out, then deploy it.

People who use knives, generally want something low profile (i.e. doesn’t stick out like a sore thumb) they want something in a flat finish (something that doesn’t gleam in the slightest bit of light in the dark), something that opens or deploys quickly, and with one hand.

Gang members are honestly more involved with shooting someone. If you want to look at the African American community and stabbings, you will find a vast majority of them are done by kitchen knives and domestic disputes, and not by butterfly wielding ninjas, switchblade using greasers.

Generally on the streets, knives are worn by various people of all backgrounds to feel like they have some sort of weapon on them, or even in a lot of cases for practicality purposes. If you live in the south, just try to open something and ask if someone has a knife… about 10 people around you will hand you one.

In the case of criminals using knives, I don’t think there is any preference other than cheap and pointy, and the bigger the better. In the case of people who know what they are doing… well let’s just say it isn’t unheard of for them to spend 300 to 500 dollars on a knife. Just for the reliability, the grade of steel, and the function.

There are a ton of different types of automatics and assisted opening knives out there, from the button push, to hidden bolsters.etc.etc.

Just remember a cheap 10 dollar knock off knife is just as dangerous as a 500 dollar Strider. But as far as which knife claims the most stabbings, I would say the Kitchen knife.

SPRICE asked What are all the different pocket knife types and what are they most useful/built for?

I just care about knives like case brand knives for this question. I’m wondering about trapper vs congress vs stockman etc. What are all those types of knives and their uses?

And got the following answer:

Hopefully one or a combination of all of them will give you the answer to your question.

Wikipedia.Search ResultsTypes of pocket knives | Collectible pocket knives
To delve into the interesting world of knives, here are the different types of pocket knives. Automatic switchblade knife is one pocket knife that is very popular …
www.2-clicks-collectableknives.com/​article-guide/types… – Cached
Knife – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Materials and…|Types of…|Rituals and…|LegislationLayers of different steel types are welded together, but then the stock is manipulated to … Traditional pocket knives and Swiss Army Knives commonly employ the nail nick …
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knife – Cached.Different Types of Pocket Knives
Pocket knives can be used for a variety of things from work to opening your mail. These can make tasks simple and easy. Choosing the right pocket knife for you can …
ezinearticles.com/?Different-Types-of-​Pocket-Knives&id=… – Cached
Different Types of Pocket Knives – Free Online Library
Free Online Library: Different Types of Pocket Knives by “Business, regional community”;
www.thefreelibrary.com/​Different+Types+of+Pocket+Knives… – Cached
Knife Blade Types – Knife Knowledge
… color: #000000; } Knife History Making of a Knife Knife Terminology Tips for Buying a Knife Knife Blade Types Knife Blade Steel Types Knife Types Popular Pocket Knife …
www.the-knife-connection.com/knife-​blade-types.html – Cached
Knife Depot: Types of Knives
Types of Knives. Knives can be categorized based on … to traditional folding knives or pocket knives. There are several styles of and sizes neck knife from several different …
www.knife-depot.com/knife-information-​13.html – Cached
A description of the different types of pocket knives.
Traditional pocket knives, lock backs, liner locks, and assisted openers. Helping you choose the right pocket knife from Pocket Knives ‘R’ Us.com.
www.pocketknivesrus.com/types-of-pocket-​knives

EveDeclara asked What is the difference between assisted opening knives and flick ones?

I’m buying a present for a friend who likes knives but where I live flick knives are apparently illegal but spring assisted aren’t.

Could someone please tell me the difference?

Thanks

And got the following answer:

There are three main types of folding knives:
1) “Pocket” knives- in these knives the blades are under no tension, and are opened entirely by the force you apply to them, the only time I have ever heard of legal complications with these knives are when the blade is too long. These knives tend cover a broad spectrum of prices, qualities and styles.

2) Assissted open knives- in these knives there is a spring or small piece of metal to keep the blade under tension when it is folded. To open these ou apply some pressure as if you were opening a flick knife and let the energy from the spring throw the blade open. The thing with these knives that make them legal to own in more places then automatic knives is that you still open them as if they didn’t have a spring in them. The spring is really only there to assist in deployment.
These knives do run into a fair amount legal red tape because of the easy, and speed of deployment.

3)Automatic knives- These are knives where the blade is under tension again but they are deployed by using a button, because the blade more often then not is concealed inside the handle. These knives are illegal far more frequently then the first two kinds, They’re usually used as a defensive weapon and the blade size and shape reflects that. These are probably what you are reffering to as “flick” knives.